Author: Rick Stroup

Aid for Former Extended Foster Care Program Youth

The Washington State Department of Children, Youth and Families is looking for help in identifying youth who will age out of or have aged out of Extended Foster Care at age 21, between March 1, 2020 and Dec. 31, 2020. The Department of Commerce: Office of Homeless Youth is seeking to distribute stipends to these young people in an effort to support housing stability.  Eligible youth will receive one check for every month they have been out of foster care through October. They will then receive one check per month, including the month of Dec. 2020. There is a possibility that all eligible youth will receive an additional check at the end of this period to ensure that all funds have been allocated.

If you currently work or have worked with a young adult that meets these qualifications, please reach out to them directly and assist them in applying.
To apply, send an email to dcyf.adolescentprograms@dcyf.wa.gov with the youth’s name, address and contact information before Nov. 13, 2020. If you do not have access to email, please call Sherrie Flores at 360-489-5280.

New Virtual King County Civil Protection Order Office

Beginning Monday, Oct. 5, anyone seeking a civil protection order will need to use the King County Superior Court Clerk’s new Virtual Civil Protection Order Office.  They will be able to submit their protection order petitions, have them reviewed by the Clerk via live conversation and receive real-time customer service.  The site also has useful information explaining the difference between protection orders, no-contact orders and restraining orders.  The new site can help someone file for the following protection orders:

    • Antiharassment
    • Domestic Violence
    • Extreme Risk
    • Sexual Assault
    • Stalking
    • Vulnerable Adult

COVID-19 Benefits Town Hall – Thursday, May 7

On Thursday, May 7 from 10AM to 12:30PM (PST) speakers from the Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD), Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA), and Employment and Training Administration’s Office of Unemployment Insurance will provide information about changes and updates to the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act and the Families First Coronavirus Response Act.  The content is aimed at both employers and employees.  This webinar is sponsored by WorkForceGPS. Attendees who do not already have a WorkForceGPS account are required to create one before registering.

Sign Up Here

 

 

Westlaw Edge Access for KCLL Patrons

In light of COVID-19, Thomson-Reuters is offering free Westlaw Edge access to KCLL patrons for a limited time.  While you will need to register, there is no commitment and no credit card is required.  Here’s how to get started:

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  1. Read the detailed registration information included here.

  2. Follow the Westlaw Edge for Library Patrons Registration link

  3. Enter your contact information.  Note: you must use an email account not already associated with an existing Westlaw account.

  4. In the Organization Type field, you must select Government – State or Local. (Note: you must select Government or access will not work)

  5. Skip the Add Colleagues page.

  6. Agree to the Terms & Conditions and select Create Profile

  7. Complete the OnePass Profile and Security fields

  8. Confirm your OnePass profile and select Get Started to begin using your new Westlaw Edge for Library Patrons trial account.

Governor Inslee Extends “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” Emergency Order to May 4

Washington State governor Jay Inslee has extended his “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” emergency order to May 4, 2020.  Read details about this extension and the governor’s original order here.

For more information about Washington State’s response to the COVID-19 situation, including current COVID-19 infection statistics, information about travel, and information for businesses and works, visit the State’s official COVID-19 response site here.

Seattle City Council Votes to Restrict Winter-Time Evictions

On Monday, February 12, the Seattle City Council unanimously passed a new ordinance that will significantly restrict residential evictions during the winter.  Council Bill 119726, if signed by the Mayor or allowed to pass into law without her signature, will prohibit Seattle landlords from evicting low- and moderate-income tenants for unpaid rent between December 1 and March 1.  The unanimous vote was only possible after amendments were added to reduce the time period, to exempt landlords managing four or fewer housing units and to restrict the scope to low- and moderate-income tenants.

Read the full text of CB 119726 here.

When or if CB 119726 becomes effective depends on whether or not Mayor Durkan chooses to veto it and is governed by SMC 1.04.020.

New Full-Service Clinic for LGBTQ Parental Rights

The QLaw Foundation of Washington is sponsoring a new, free, full-representation legal clinic called Family Matters to help LGBTQ families get legal orders affirming their legal parental relationships to the children they are raising.

Assistance will be provided by both attorneys and social workers and will vary in length depending on the family’s needs.  LGBTQ families living anywhere in King County are eligible to apply.  All services provided by Family Matters are free of charge.

To request help, you can complete the online registration form here or send an email to info@qlawfoundation.org indicating your family would like help from the Family Matters clinic.

Notice Loophole a Scary Prospect for Month-to-Month Tenants

According to a recent article in CrosscutLegislators passed eviction protections. Washington landlords found loopholes — a new provision in the recently-revised Residential Landlord-Tenant Act may prove to be a scary prospect for month-to-month tenants.

RCW 59.18.410(3)(d) states:

“A  tenant  who  has  been  served  with  three  or  more  notices to pay or vacate for failure to pay rent as set forth in RCW 59.12.040 within twelve months prior to the notice to pay or vacate upon which the proceeding  is  based  may  not  seek  relief  under  this  subsection (3).”

On its face, this subsection would appear to undo many of the new tenant protections put in place by the Washington Legislature.  Crosscut asserts that landlords across the state have started serving pay-or-vacate notices the day after rent becomes due, often in situations where tenants have been accustomed to a short grace period.  That grace period can be important for low-income tenants relying on the arrival of Social Security or other social services’ payments.  Tenants who receive three such notices in a 12-month period, regardless of having made their rent payments, would not be able to take advantage of the other protections provided in RCW 59.18.410(3).

The text of ESSB 5600, as signed by the Governor, is here.