Category: Links

King County Superior Court Family Law Facilitators

The Family Law Facilitator Program at King County Superior Court provides information and referrals to family law litigants who are not represented by attorneys.  Litigants may meet with a facilitator on a walk-in basis (walk-ins are first come, first served, and sign-in will end 30 minutes prior to closing or once capacity is reached) or by pre-scheduled appointment (for document review or if an interpreter is required).

King County Hearing Examiner

The Hearing Examiner conducts hearings on certain types of land use applications and on appeals of county administrative orders and decisions. The Examiner issues formal decisions or makes recommendations to the King County Council on the matters heard.

How to Waive Interest on Legal Financial Obligations

This guide, brought to you by the American Civil Liberties Union of Washington State, provides information and forms on how to obtain a court order waiving or reducing interest on legal financial obligations (LFOs) in Washington State. Defined by statute RCW 10.82.090, the court may, on motion by the offender, reduce or waive the interest on legal financial obligations ordered as a result of a criminal conviction.

How to Vacate/Seal Felony Conviction Records

This brochure provides information and forms on how to vacate records concerning certain non-violent Class B or C felony convictions in Washington State for offenses occurringon or after July 1, 1984. “Vacate” is the term Washington law uses to describe a process for clearing a felony conviction from a person’s criminal record when certain requirements are met. The Washington State Patrol will remove a vacated conviction from the version of a person’s official criminal history record that is disseminated to the public. This provides some limited protection in background checks for employment, housing, and other purposes but it does not stop disclosure of all information about your conviction – information about the court records associated with a vacated conviction are still public and easily accessible on the Washington Courts website unless, in addition to a vacate order, you also get an order to seal or redact the court records and court indexes. Although vacating a conviction or clearing it from your record is sometimes informally called “expungement,” that term is confusing in Washington. In other states, expungement of a conviction may mean that it is deleted from a person’s records. There currently is no Washington statute that would allow for the literal expungement, deletion, or destruction of an adult conviction record.

How to Vacate a Misdemeanor Record (Seattle)

Vacating a conviction for a misdemeanor crime means the Court determines you meet certain conditions and orders. If you pled guilty to a crime, your plea will be changed to not guilty and then the charges are dismissed. If you were found guilty, the court may set aside the conviction, dismiss the case and vacate the judgment and sentence. If your record is vacated, your name, the case number, the charge, a “V” for vacated, and, “DV” if the file was related to domestic violence may still show up on the Court’s information system. Vacating a record does not remove information from the Court’s electronic record keeping system. The record will remain, and it will be available to the public. The record will be updated to contain additional information about the vacation of the record.