Category: Uncategorized

New Search Tool for African American History

The University of Minnesota library recently launched Umbra Search African American History, a search interface that provides access to over 400,000 digitized materials that document African American history. These are freely available resources that are in the digital collections of more than a thousand partner libraries, archives, museums and other institutions located across the United States. The materials include music, oral histories, photographs, maps, handwritten letters, and more. Director of the project Cecily Marcus says:

“No library is able to digitize all of its holdings, but by bringing together materials from all over the country, Umbra Search allows students and scholars to tell stories that have never been told before. Umbra Search partners have amazing collections, and now those materials can sit side by side with related content from a library on the other side of the country.”

Handbook for Washington Seniors Updated

Legal Voice has updated the Handbook for Washington Seniors: Legal Rights and Resources for 2016 into 2017. The Handbook is a quick-reference guide covering legal rights, health care, housing, etc. The Handbook answers common questions about the issues seniors are likely to face. The Handbook may also be helpful to the family and caregivers of seniors.

You can find a digital copy of this resource available for free at www.legalvoice.org/handbook. You can also order a copy for $20 from Legal Voice.

You may also view a copy of this resource in the library, available at RES KF 390.A4 H36 (ask for it at the front information desk).

Voting Rights Restoration in Washington State

According to the Washington Secretary of State (SOS):

  • If you were convicted of a felony in a Washington State court, your right to vote is restored automatically once you are no longer under the authority of DOC (in prison or on community custody). If you have questions about your status with DOC, call at (800) 430-9674.
  • If you were convicted of a felony in another state or in federal court, your right to vote is restored automatically as long as you are not currently incarcerated for that felony.
  • You do not lose the right to vote for a misdemeanor conviction or a conviction in juvenile court.
  • You do not need a certificate of discharge (COD) to have your voting rights restored.

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Washington has also updated their information on the restoration of voting rights for those that have been convicted of felonies as an adult. The page includes answers to many important questions such as:

  • How do convictions affect my right to vote?
  • How do I know when I’m eligible to have my rights restored?
  • Do I need to re-register to vote?
  • Who should I contact if I run into difficulty?

Voting is critically important in a democracy and everyone who has the right should have their voice heard. You can register to vote at the King County Law Library.

Need more help? Visit our Legal Clinics page to learn about the Re-Entry Clinic, as well as our Guide to Criminal Law Clinics & Resources in King County.

Susan Carlson: Washington’s First Female Supreme Court Clerk

Our State Supreme Court recently appointed Deputy Clerk Susan Carlson as our State’s first female Supreme Court Clerk, replacing retired Clerk Ron Carpenter. The following is excerpted from the Supreme Court’s official announcement:

“The Washington Supreme Court’s nine justices have appointed the state’s first female Supreme Court Clerk in Washington State history. Deputy Clerk Susan Carlson, was sworn in today as the Court Clerk by Chief Justice Barbara A. Madsen and justices of the Court.  Carlson replaces long-time Court Clerk Ron Carpenter, who retired from the position at the end of March after serving 10 years in the role. She will serve as the 9th Supreme Court Clerk in Washington State history. The position of Supreme Court Clerk was created in 1934 to maintain the court’s records, files and documents. The clerk is also responsible for managing the court’s case flow, including the preparation of its calendars and docketing of all cases and papers filed with the court.  The Clerk’s Office manages the Court’s case flow and the filing of supporting documents for approximately 1,000 petitions and motions considered each year by the Washington Supreme Court. The Office also manages attorney licensing and discipline, and manages documents related to death-penalty cases filed with the Court. “I am honored to be selected to serve as the Supreme Court Clerk,” said Carlson of the appointment. “To say that I am excited to take on this role is an understatement and I look forward to serving the Court and the people of the State of Washington.”

KCLL Hires a New Director

The Board of Trustees and the staff are pleased to announce that KCLL has hired Barbara Swatt Engstrom as its new Executive Director.  Ms. Swatt Engstrom, who holds a J.D. from the University of Wyoming College of Law and an M.L.I.S. from the University of Washington Information School, has over 15 years of experience in law librarianship, most recently as Librarian and Adjunct Professor at the Seattle University School of Law.  She will join the KCLL team on September 1, 2016.  Welcome, Barbara!