Category: Uncategorized

Aid for Former Extended Foster Care Program Youth

The Washington State Department of Children, Youth and Families is looking for help in identifying youth who will age out of or have aged out of Extended Foster Care at age 21, between March 1, 2020 and Dec. 31, 2020. The Department of Commerce: Office of Homeless Youth is seeking to distribute stipends to these young people in an effort to support housing stability.  Eligible youth will receive one check for every month they have been out of foster care through October. They will then receive one check per month, including the month of Dec. 2020. There is a possibility that all eligible youth will receive an additional check at the end of this period to ensure that all funds have been allocated.

If you currently work or have worked with a young adult that meets these qualifications, please reach out to them directly and assist them in applying.
To apply, send an email to dcyf.adolescentprograms@dcyf.wa.gov with the youth’s name, address and contact information before Nov. 13, 2020. If you do not have access to email, please call Sherrie Flores at 360-489-5280.

New Virtual King County Civil Protection Order Office

Beginning Monday, Oct. 5, anyone seeking a civil protection order will need to use the King County Superior Court Clerk’s new Virtual Civil Protection Order Office.  They will be able to submit their protection order petitions, have them reviewed by the Clerk via live conversation and receive real-time customer service.  The site also has useful information explaining the difference between protection orders, no-contact orders and restraining orders.  The new site can help someone file for the following protection orders:

    • Antiharassment
    • Domestic Violence
    • Extreme Risk
    • Sexual Assault
    • Stalking
    • Vulnerable Adult

REPORT: Legal Cybersecurity in the Digital Age

Most of us know that our digital communications face a number of threats these days – from data breaches and hacks, to public and private surveillance.  These risks also threaten the confidentiality of attorney-client relationships.  The ACLU of New York has written a report that outlines steps that can be taken by parties to protect that privacy, and rules that can ensure ongoing protection.

State Supreme Court Abruptly Ends LLLT Program

Without public debate or a formal hearing on the topic, the Washington State Supreme Court decided last month to end the Limited Licence Legal Technician (LLLT) program.  The June letter ends a program that broadened access to legal representation and served as a model for other states across the nation.   Please read/listen to the KNKX new story HERE. 

New Hope for Clearing Criminal Conviction Records

The New Hope Act (Chapter 331 of the Laws of 2019) became effective on July 28, 2019 and makes substantial changes to the rights and procedures for clearing criminal misdemeanor and felony conviction records in Washington State.

Among these changes are improved notice requirements for the Department of Corrections and the clerk of the court; the ability to vacate Assault in the second degree, Assault in the third degree when not committed against a law enforcement or peace officer, and Robbery in the second degree under specific circumstances; and the removal of restrictions based on prior vacations and the modification of restrictions based on prior restraining/protection orders.

For instructions and forms related to these new provisions, visit the New Hope Act portion of the Civil Survival web site.

Public Defenders to Help Vacating Eligible Convictions

The King County Office of Public Defense has announced a new initiative to help people remove eligible convictions from their record.  Eligibility depends on the type of conviction (many misdemeanors and non-violent Class B & Class C felonies) as well as the amount of time that has passed since the conviction – among other things.

 

The Seattle Times published a good article on the announcement, which can be found HERE.

Information on the Office of Public Defense can be found HERE.

How to Nullify Your Property’s Discriminatory Covenants

Many Seattle homeowners are unaware that their property may have restrictive covenants (dictating what types of people can own the property) attached to it that are based on outdated, unenforceable and racist policies from the past.  But beginning January 1st of 2019, homeowners can ask the King County Recorder’s Office to modify any of their deeds that contain such language.  Read the Seattle Times article HERE.

Real Change’s New Resource Guide for Homelessness

Real Change released Seattle’s The Emerald City Resource Guide in April 2018. This new pocket-size resource guide is intended to help homeless people navigate a spiderweb of resources in King County. You can download The Emerald City Resource Guide here.

A common refrain in homeless services is that Seattle’s strength — a large number of nonprofits working to take care of homeless people — is also its weakness. In 2017, King County was home to 77 organizations that shelter or house homeless people. That’s 25 more than the city of San Francisco, and more than the entire state of Montana.

If you’re homeless, navigating this vast network can be hard. That’s why Real Change released a pocket guide to services for homeless people.

“Real Change is printing 40,000 copies of this Emerald City Resource Guide, a 132-page booklet they hope homeless people will use to navigate the city’s spiderweb of resources.” (Photo courtesy of Real Change)

This durable and comprehensive pocket-sized booklet puts 132 slim pages of essential resources at the fingertips of homeless and very low-income people. New editions of the Emerald City Resource Guide will be published at least annually to keep services reliable and accurate.

The guidebook will list services such as health care, shelters and meals — and also features special sections for help with LGBTQ resources, culturally specific services and assistance with immigration issues.

The Emerald City Resource Guide complements online service listings that already exist by making the information immediately accessible to those who lack consistent access to technology.

According to Real Change Director Tim Harris, “I recently heard the story of a woman at a bus stop late at night, when she was approached by a young woman looking for a place to stay that night. The young woman didn’t have a cell phone, and by that time libraries were closed and she had nowhere to turn to look up local shelters. The first woman quickly searched through her phone, and was able to point the young woman in the right direction. If she had a guidebook, she said, she would have been able to hand the young woman a copy, connecting her to more support opportunities.”

“This is our vision on the Emerald City Resource Guide: a pocket-sized portal to change. As someone flips through the guidebook, looking for a shelter, maybe they’ll pass an entry on drug treatment services, or a job readiness program, and inspiration will spark.” – Real Change Director, Tim Harris

This pilot guidebook was made possible by a $20,000 Seattle Human Services Department Innovation Grant, $12,000 in sponsorships from a wide variety of partners, and around $4,000 of Real Change’s own money. Current sponsors of the Resource Guide include: 2-1-1, YWCA, Amerigroup Washington, Muslim Association of Puget Sound, Neighborcare Health, Jewish Family Service, DESC, Solid Ground, Evergreen Treatment Services, Pike Place Market Senior Center, Recovery Café, ROOTS and Community Health Plan of WA.

Read more about this new resource in Real Change News: Director’s Corner or The Seattle Times.

Upcoming Class: Civil Law Suits without Tears – The Basics of Representing Yourself in Court

Representing yourself in court is a complicated process and can be overwhelming. In this workshop, you will learn the basics of the civil lawsuit process with a focus on court rules, court procedures, forms, scheduling, and deadlines. Attendees will be granted access to a password protected website with additional information and resources, including the most commonly used civil litigation forms.

Common civil lawsuit types include landlord tenant, family law, wills and probate, garnishment of wages, personal injury, and property disputes, just to name a few. This class does not cover immigration proceedings or criminal proceedings such as DUI or felony and misdemeanor offenses.

The workshop will be 90 minutes and will run from 6-7:30pm.

When: Wednesday, April 18th, 2018 (6:00PM – 7:30PM)

Where: SPL (Seattle Public Library) Central Library, Level 4 Room 2

1000 4th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
Level 4, Room 2
Phone: (206) 386-4636

Get Directions

Suitable for: Adults

Language: English

Download a class flyer here.

Find more information on the Seattle Public Library Website.